Nashville Home Inspector – Hairy Wood?

Nashville Home Inspector – What’s Wrong With This Picture?

HINT:  Hairy wood is rarely a good thing.

ANSWER:  Everything!  What you are looking at is a piece of wood that supports a porch.  So you are looking from below the porch and the grey material at the bottom of the picture is the concrete foundation wall.  What you are also looking at is some white fungal growth (that’s the nicest way I can describe it) in different forms.  There is the white powdery stuff near the top of the wood, then there is the creepy angle-hair stuff hanging down from the wood.  YUCK!  To make matters worse, there is a brown fungal growth growing on the white angle-hair growth.  These are probably all different types of mold.  So we have mold growing on top of mold.  Talk about a situation out of control!

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

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Nashville Home Inspector – Vegetation Proximity to Home and Buildings

Proximity of Vegetation To A Building

When HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, conducts Home or Building Inspection in Nashville or Middle Tennessee, inspection of the vegetation at the exterior or the building is one of the components of the inspection.  Vegetation in close proximity to a home or building can have a negative impact on the structure.  The negative impact can include mechanical damage, limited access, mold, structural damage, and infestation from insects, rodents and/or reptiles.  Sometimes the effect of the vegetation is not so subtle, as in the picture below.

 Tree on House

Other times vegetation in close proximity can seem more insignificant, as in the picture below.

  

Often times homeowners can actually prefer vegetation close to or touching the building because they think it gives a quaint setting or special look.  HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, understands the urge to pursue cosmetic appeal but disagrees with the concept of allowing vegetation to be in touch with the building.  In fact, HABITEC recommends at least 18″ spacing between any vegetation and the exterior of the building, and that trees not be allowed to overhang the building.  I’ll explain why as we go. 

The 18″ rule is a HABITEC rule, not one offered by State Rules or a building code.  Other Inspectors may use a different number, or set of measurements.  The point is that vegetation should not be allowed in contact with the structure, and that using a guide of 18″ will provide a pad so that when the wind blows the vegetation does not reach over and hit the building anyway, at least not most of the time.  In the picture below it is easy to imagine a gentle wind blowing these tree limbs back and forth and the limbs just continuing to beat the heck our of the house.  Remember, a house is not designed or built to withstand that kind of impact.

roof vegetation encroachment 

The damage that could occur in the pic above is called mechanical damage.  Mechanical damage is when the vegetation actually damages the building because it touches the building.  The action of the wind moving the limbs back and forth can cause the damage.  The larger the branches the larger the potential damage.  See the photo below.

Branch Encroachment

Trees that overhang a roof can have a significant impact on the building.  This impact can include depositing leaves into gutters until the gutter is clogged and defective and depositing debris on the roof that creates a condition conducive for mold growth.  The photo below is of a tree overhanging an apartment building.

Vegetation Overhanging the Roof

Trees near or overhanging the roof can deposit enough leaves to render the roof drainage system defective.  See the picture below.

Leaf filled gutters

The picture below is of a gutter system that is full of leaf debris and water.  Obviously this water has no place to go and will just overflow when the next rain comes.

Filled gutter - Standing Water

Filled gutters can be quickly overrun as in the picture below taken during a rain storm.

overwhelmed gutter

Water management systems such as the gutter/downspout/extension system that are filled with debris may not work well or at all.  Failure of water management systems is the most common discrepancy found on home and commercial building inspections.  Water that overflows a gutter can drop to the foundation wall at the base of the building and weaken the foundation, or the water can penetrate the crawl space or basement and create an environment conducive for mold growth.  Overflowing gutters can also cause structural damage to the fascia and soffits that make up the eaves, as in the photo below.

Significant Damage to soffit and Fascia

Overflowing gutters can also back-flow into the attic area and damage the wood that makes up the roof including the roof truss and decking.  See the photo below.  In this photo you are looking at the back side of fascia from inside the attic.  The fascia has been damaged by water from overflowing gutters.

Water Damage Decking

Vegetation in contact with a structure can cause structural damage in different ways.  From the discussion above we now know one form of structural damage is caused by mechanical damage and another form can be caused by overflowing gutters in a failed water management system.  But structural damage can also be caused by moisture in the vegetation that is held against the building.  Now lets talk about that. 

Although the exterior of buildings is expected to get wet when it rains, it is also expected to dry out in a reasonable time when the rain stops.  In the picture below mechanical damage may occur from these shrubs touching the building but a more significant threat is the effect of moisture held against the building.  Shrubs are not as powerful as trees when it comes to mechanical damage but shrubs can hold more water in the leaves and branches for a longer period of time because shrubs are usually thicker than trees.

Shrubs in Contact 3 

Moisture held against the building by shrubs keeps the building wet.  A wet building is more likely to allow water inside the building which can damage structural components and/or create an environment conducive for mold growth. 

Another issue with shrubs and trees touching the building is that insects, rodents, reptiles and small animals, like raccoons, can use this vegetation as a path into the building via the attic.  See the picture below of a black widow spider in an attic.

Black Widow

Another problem with vegetation in touch with or overhanging the building is the potential for mold.  Mold can form from debris deposited on the roof by a tree overhanging the house.  See the photo below.  This fungal growth was caused by deposits on the roof from an overhanging evergreen tree. 

Roof Shingle fungal Growth 

Sometimes attic mold can start at the exterior on the roof as shown above.  Deposits of tree debris on the roof can create fungal growth that can actually work its way inside the roof to the attic and create a mold growth there.  See the photo below.

Attic Decking Mold 1

In the photo above the decking supporting the roof has mold growth present.  This mold growth may have started because of the mold on the exterior of the roof that was shown in the previous picture. 

Another issue with vegetation proximity to buildings involves limited access.  Vegetation that is allowed to grow where normally people need to walk can inhibit normal access.  Such is the case when ivy is allowed to grown on the railing of a deck staircase.  Few people are willing to stick their hand inside the ivy as they walk up or down the stairs, thereby impeding this safety feature of the steps. 

Another issue with vegetation is the proximity to utilities.  The issue in the picture below is usually limiting access for utility workers and technicians so they can read or service the gas meter.

Gas Meter Behind shrubs

Likewise vegetation in front of the electrical panel inhibits the accessibility of the service technician and meter reader in the pictures below.

Electrical Panel Encroachment 2

In fact the vegetation can be so close as to interfere with opening the panel as in the photo below.

Electrical Panel Encroachment 3

However, it is possible for vegetation to interfere with the operation of utilities, especially HVAC components.  If the vegetation impacts the cooling vents the unit has a difficult time with the cooling function.

Vege Crowded HVAC

So bottom line, keep vegetation at least 18″ away from the structure and do not allow the trees to overhang the house.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

 

http://habitecinspections.com

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Mold Assessment Services in Nashville – For or Against?

HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, offers mold assessment services (inspection and sampling) in Nashville and Middle Tennessee.  Some have suggested that mold services including testing and assessments are not necessary.  I disagree and here is why.

First let me say that mold services are not for everybody.  At HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, we have undergone training at two agencies and I can say that this is a complicated subject and a very serious service to offer.  It is not unreasonable for some to go through the training and find that they simply do not understand the material.  If you are poorly trained, or you just cannot understand the information, then you will not be able to offer a quality service.  I encourage those people not to engage in mold assessments.

Second, I agree with those who see a conflict of interest when an individual is trained, tested and “certified” by the same agency (like a lab) that will provide support lab services for the assessor.  How could you ever fail?  I think it is important that third party agencies do the training and certification, not the company offering lab services. 

Third, lab support is critical to successful mold services.   If you have poor lab support in the form of sample processing or the physical report, you will not offer a quality mold service.  At HABITEC we use the MoldREPORT which is an excellent presentation of the lab results.

Fourth, some suggest that you can determine whether or not you have mold in your house just by using your eyes or nose.  Therefore, there is no need to test.  I strongly disagree.  The EPA and many in the business of IAQ will tell you that scientific knowledge of mold is growing every day.  What is known today will be enhanced tomorrow.  An example is that there are hundreds of species of mold and many more suspected.  They come in many different colors, shapes, sizes and textures.  They are created from different sources.  Some have little smell at all, especially if it is dormant.  To suggest that an individual can “know” they have mold in their building based solely on their senses of sight or smell is a mistake.  This mistake can waste money cleaning or removing material that is normal household dirt or, worse, endanger someone’s health if not identified correctly. 

Mold assessments should only be conducted by individuals who have undergone quality training and testing, individuals who can clearly explain to their Client the many aspects of mold including options for mitigation, and individuals willing and able to help the Client through the complete mitigation process including mitigation verification.

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Roofers Gone Wild!

 
ROOFERS GONE WILD! – HOW TO MESS UP A PERFECTLY GOOD ROOF
 
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At HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, we sometimes see situations during a Home Inspection and we wonder just what were they thinking.  It seems like they did things wrong just to say they could.  Look at the picture of the roof shingles below.  What’s wrong?

HINT: Water flows downhill, and this picture was taken from a roof top.

ANSWER:  Actually this is wrong from whatever angle you look at it.  In any condition, whether in a valley as shown or on a slope of the roof, composite roof shingles should always be installed so that the shingles overlap from the top down.  In other words, the upper shingle overlaps the lower shingle.  In this photo, the shingles from one side of the valley were simply carried over on top of the other side, in the forefront.  That puts the downslope shingles above the upslope shingles.  It won’t take much for water from upslope shingles to slip under the downslope shingles and onto the decking below.  This is a poor roof valley shingle installation.  The picture below is how it should look.  And the picture below is from the same roof, different valley.  What were they thinking?

On the same house the shingles have been used as siding for the second floor dormers.  This is not the usual but it is allowed.  Look at the “siding” below.  Does that look OK?  HINT:  NO!

ANSWER:  The hint already gave it away.  The correct way to install these “siding shingles” is shown below.  Neat and orderly with the top shingle overlapping the lower shingle.

Last but not least, strange things come to homes in foreclosure.  For an example see the picture below.  What’s missing from this new roof?  HINT:  New roof shingles should look similar to each other.

ANSWER:  The good news is that the shingles needed to finish this ridge are laying over there on the right in this picture.  Some of them anyway.  This home went into foreclosure while the builder/roofer were installing the new roof.  Knowing they probably would not get paid, they at least covered the ridge opening with whatever they had handy.  Then just left the rest laying up on the roof.  In this case we do know what they were thinking.

To comment on this article email to richard@habitecinspections.com

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Confined Spaces – When Is Tight Too Tight?

 
Confined Spaces – When is Tight Too Tight?
 
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Recently I had a REALTOR ask if there were circumstances when an Inspector would not crawl through the entire crawl space.  I explained that sometimes we don’t go everywhere in the crawl space because it simply is not possible or safe.  I went on to explain that access to some areas of the crawl space may be blocked by debris, HVAC ductwork and/or tight spacing.  That did not seem to be the answer she was looking for.  But it got me to thinking, when is tight too tight?  Take a look at the picture below.

What you are looking at, in addition to the wet crawl space, is ductwork running through a crawl space.  There is a corner on the left and, yes, you can see around the corner when you get up to it, but there is also an area behind the ductwork to the right that you cannot see.  Is that area accessible?  Not from this angle.  So if there is not another way back there, what next?  Force your way under the ductwork?  Absolutely not!  There is not enough room plus that stuff is heavy.  Even if you could squirm under somewhere, what happens if an HVAC strap lets go because of your effort and the whole thing comes down on top of the Inspector?  How is the Inspector to get out from underneath all that weight?  And quickly before suffocation?

You cannot go over the ductwork for two reasons.  First, there is no room.  And second, even if there was room, what if you lost your balance and dropped onto the ductwork, damaging it?  Who is going to pay to fix it?  The Client?  The REALTOR?  Probably not.  Will the home owner just let it go?  Doubt it.  No, I think that one is on the Inspector.  Can he fix it himself?  No.  He probably does not have the tools, training, material or license to do the work.  So he is stuck with the bill.  All because he tried to go somewhere he couldn’t.

So in this case, without another path behind the ductwork, that area is inaccessible.  Too tight!

Oh by the way, here is what it looked like after I turned that corner.  Still not much luck.

Some general safety rules of crawl space entry are as follows.  These rules can be applied to Inspectors and home owners alike.

1.  Take two flashlights and a cell phone.  If the first light loses power, you’ll have the second to find your way out.  The cell phone comes in very handy if you get trapped or hurt.  It’s also another source of light, albeit a poor one.

2.  Make sure someone knows you will be in a crawl space and approximately when you should be out of the crawl space.  That way if you become incapacitated hopefully someone will realize you are missing before it is too late.

3.  Do not crawl over ductwork, standing water or electrical lines.  If you have to crawl over ductwork, move components or take in a breath to enter a space, it is too close to be entered. 

4.  Be alert to Confined Spaces that should not be entered.  Do not force your way into areas that are too close.  NACHI has an excellent Continuing Education course about Home Inspector safety that deals with this issue.  According to NACHI and the OSHA website, a “confined space,” as defined in OSHA’s General Industry Standard (29.CFR.1910), is a space that:

 a.  is large enough and is so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work;

 b.  has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example:  tanks, vessels, silos, bins, hoppers, vaults, pits, etc.); and

 c.  is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.

NOTE:  OSHA defines a crawl space as a non-permit required confined space.  Therefore, a Home Inspector can enter a crawl space without a permit but according to item 4.a above, if the space is not large enough to enter and perform assigned work or the employee [Home Inspector] cannot perform assigned work [because the space is too tight], this space should not be entered.  In Tennessee, the TN Home Inspection Rules as established by the TN Department of Commerce, Rules for Home Inspectors, Chapter 0780-5-12.10, Standards of Practice, item 6.b.3, states that “Home Inspectors are not required to enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons.” 

5.  Be alert to strange odors that can be a hint of problems.  Obviously, if you smell gas, leave immediately.  Crawl space odors like watermelon indicate the presence of snakes.  If you observe snakes or evidence of snakes, or any other animal or pest that may be a threat to your health, leave the crawl space immediately.  Make a note on the report.

6.  Use a fanny pack to carry small items in the crawl space, like your cell phone and equipment testers you may need.

7.  Wear gloves and breathing protection.  The gloves protect your hand somewhat when you are searching around in the dark and the breathing protection protects you from all the dust and insulation you can breathe in.

So hey, let’s be careful out there. If you would like to comment on this article please email to richard@habitecinspections.com

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Crawl Space Mold? Who Cares?

CRAWL SPACE MOLD?  WHO CARES?

 
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WOW, what a year 2010 has been for crawl space mold in Nashville and Middle Tennessee!  If you live there and especially if you work in the real estate world, you have probably noticed a clear uptick of mold issues in crawl spaces.  But do we really care?  I mean after all no one actually lives down there.  And few people ever go down there.  So who cares if there is mold in the crawl space?  Well, if you have a crawl space, you should care.  Did you know that some experts say that 40% or more of the air that enters the home or building enters from the crawl space!  So if you have mold in the crawl space, soon you will have mold inside the building.
 
At HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, offering environmental services including mold assessments as well as home and commercial building inspections, we have seen an increase in calls about mold in general.  Why do you think that is?  Well, I think it all started with the May 2010 flood.  Those homes and buildings that may have had a mild issue with mold suddenly became very active with mold and then came the ripple effect of mold growth.  Mostly in the form of people getting sick.  And most of that in the form of respiratory distress.
 
Look at the picture below.  What’s wrong?  HINT:  What’s that white stuff on the wood?

ANSWER:  For now we call the white stuff microbial growth, or mold-like material.  Many people quickly call this mold, but without a lab analysis we don’t know for sure.  Samples should be taken and sent for lab analysis.  Only a trained lab technician can make the final determination if a foreign material is mold or not.  To declare a foreign substance is mold based on the senses of sight or smell is a risky business.  See the closeup of the material below.

Clearly something happened here to create this growth.  For mold growth to occur, there must be excess moisture, a source of food (like wood), and a surface to grow on (like wood).  Bingo, we get microbial growth and possibly mold.  Certainly this should be treated seriously and removed if possible. 

If the lab tech declares this mold, the EPA and HABITEC recommends that the mold should be removed (remediated).  If it not practical or possible to remove the mold and the material it is growing on, the mold should be cleaned (mitigated) as much as possible and then the material it is growing on should be treated with a fungicide.  

But first, anytime you have a mold issue, the first thing to do is eliminate the water source.  If you don’t eliminate the water source, the mold issue is likely to return after remediation or mitigation.  See the article Water in the Crawl Space to learn more about water in the crawl space and how to fix it.  Once the water source is eliminated, then you can go after the mold. 

Crawl space mold can show up on the wood joists and beam as shown above, or on the subfloor as shown below.

In the case of the picture above, condensation from the HVAC duct has worked its way onto the subfloor and caused damage and mold growth.

Another mold issue in the crawl space is mold growth on HVAC ductwork, as seen in the picture below. 

Mold on the ductwork is especially troublesome because mold has the ability to migrate inside the insulation through small cracks in the seams or any holes.  If mold gets inside the ductwork, you have the worst case scenario for mold dispersal throughout the building.  Remember, mold growth is possible because of mold spores.  Mold spores are microscopic particles dispersed by mold to facilitate propagation.  Like weeds in bloom.  Once those blooms disperse, more weeds will grow.  And if you put some wind behind this process, like the air from the HVAC blower, the whole building can become compromised.  Worse case scenario!

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Water in the Crawl Space – 12.4.10

During a recent Nashville Home Inspection a HABITEC Home Inspector observed the Crawl Space Moisture.  See the picture below.  What’s Wrong With This Picture? 

HINT:  What’s that shiny stuff in the insulation?

Wet Insulation in Crawl

ANSWER:  Wait, that’s water!  Lots of water!  That cannot be good, can it?  Well, a little moisture in the crawl space is OK, but a lot is bad!  And insulation should never be wet.  If you start to pull the wet insulation down to see above, guess what you find.  See below.

Pulling the Insulation Back

Pulling the insulation all the way out may reveal the whole truth, and it’s not pretty.  See below.

Water and Mold-Like Material

Bottom line, keep those crawl spaces as dry as you can!  To learn how, and see the rest of this article, please click here.

To comment or ask questions about this article please email to richard@habitecinspections.com.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!