Nashville Inspector’s Top 10 Discrepancies on Home Inspections

2012 Top 10 Most Common Home Inspection Discrepancies in Nashville

10.  Vegetation encroaching on the house.  Vegetation that encroaches on the home can damage the home, trap moisture against the home, and allow a path for insects, rodents and reptiles to enter the home.  Keep vegetation at least 18” away from the home or components.

9. Window or door trim caulk.  Cracks or gaps in the caulk around door and window trim can allow water to penetrate behind the trim.  This water can deteriorate the trim and the framing near the doors and windows.  Any crack or gap in the trim or caulk should be repaired with new caulk and paint.

8.  Brick veneer stress cracks.  These cracks are most likely located near the corners of doors and windows, or at the down-slope corner of the home.  Brick veneer cracks are frequently an indication of water management failure.  Repair any crack in the brick veneer that exceeds 1/8 inch in width.

7.  Roof penetration boot cracks.  The rubber-like neoprene component of roof penetrations (roof boots) for plumbing vents can crack after about 7 years and cause roof leaks.  Use of caulk is only a temporary repair.  These cracked components need to be replaced.

6.  Condensate drains.  HVAC condensate drains that terminate at the foundation wall can allow significant moisture to accumulate at the foundation wall and possibly enter the crawl space.  Condensate drains should terminate at the exterior of the home, at least 18” from the home, and to terrain that slopes away from the home.

5.  Grading and lot drainage.  The grade of the soil adjacent to the home can allow moisture to flow toward the home and weaken the foundation or enter the crawl space or basement and create an environment conducive to mold.  HABITEC recommends at least a 6” drop in grade over the first 10’ of horizontal space from the home.

4.  Failing roof drainage systems including gutters, downspouts and extensions.  Gutters that are full of debris, rusted or poorly sloped can allow water to overflow and drop to the foundation wall or backflow into the attic or house.  Downspouts that are disconnected from the underground drainage components can allow water to drop at the foundation wall.  Make sure these components are clean and function properly.

3.  Inadequate crawl space moisture barrier.  Some moisture will inevitably make its way to the crawl space.  Having a crawl space moisture barrier of 6 mil plastic covering 100% of graded crawl space soil that slopes to a positive drain will help control moisture that does make its way to the crawl space.

2.  Water in the crawl space. Water in the crawl space can cause either structural failure if allowed to pool at the foundation walls or around the piers, or mold to start growing on the wood components.

1.  Crawl space mold.  Moisture allowed to accumulate inside the crawl space can lead to mold in the crawl space.  Forty percent of the air that enters the home comes from the crawl space.  Mold can be hazardous to your health.  Make every effort to prevent moisture accumulation in the crawl space.

Richard Acree

http://habitecinspections.com

Home Inspector in Nashville find Gutters that have Gone Mad

Nashville Home Inspections – What’s Wrong With This Picture?  11-4-12

Look at the picture below.  The picture was taken from the top of the roof of a new home, looking down into a valley of sorts.  What’s wrong?  Is that a piece of debris left over from the roofers?  Or is some new type of “gutter guard”?

HINT:  Gutters should be used at the end of the roof, not the middle.

ANSWER:  No, it is not a piece of debris.  It is a piece of gutter installed intentionally toward the end of the valley.  Apparently in an attempt to direct runoff into the gutter/downspout system.  But this is highly irregular, don’t you think?  A closer view is shown below.

So it might work, sort of.  But what if a little more debris collects there?  And how much water can it handle?  And how did it pass the municipal inspection?  Remember, it’s a new roof!  And how is it held in place there?

Thank you,

Richard Acree

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http://habitecinspections.com

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, and contributing members of the Active Rain Real Estate network, and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings. HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill and more! In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis. Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753.

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Nashville Home Inspector – What’s Wrong with this Picture 10-29-12?

Please look at the photo below.  I found this on a roof at a plumbing vent penetration.  What’s wrong?

HINT:  Do-It-Yourselfers love duct tape.

ANSWER:  The neoprene composite boot for residential plumbing vent penetrations is good for only 7-8 years before they start to crack due to the effects of sun and rain.  There is a cheap fix available at most home supply stores that is a boot sleeve that simply slips down on top of the damaged boot.  You cannot see the damaged boot in the photo above because a do-it-yourselfer solved the problem with some duct tape.  At least they used black duct tape so it looks like the composite boot.  But soon this amateur repair will fail also because tape does poorly in sun and rain as well.  And speaking of failing, when we see this installation, we make a note to check below this area in the attic to see if there is evidence of water intrusion.  After all, most folks would not make this effort with the tape unless there was an event that drew their attention, right?  Look at the photo below to see what we found in the attic below this taped repair.

That is a bucket strategically placed below these vent pipes.  Unfortunately there was nothing on the disclosure statement about previous water leaks.

To comment or ask questions send email to richard@habitecinspections.com.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

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http://habitecinspections.com

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, and contributing members of the Active Rain Real Estate network, and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings. HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill and more! In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis. Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753.

Home About HABITEC Home Inspections Commercial Building Inspections Environmental Services Public-Guest Speaker Meet Your Inspectors Residential REALTORS Education Material Service Providers Sample Reports References Contact Us Articles FacebookLinked ActiveRain Blog Blogger WordPress FAQ Payment and Fees Thank You Facebook  LinkedIn  ActiveRain Blog  Blogger  WordPress Thank You

Nashville Home Inspector – Dryer Vent – What’s Wrong with this Picture 10-28-12?

Nashville Home Inspection – What’s Wrong With This Picture?  10-28-2012

Please see the photo below.  You are outside a home looking at the back side of the basement exterior wall.  What’s wrong?

HINT:  Hangers belong in closets.

ANSWER:  Funny thing is it probably does some good.  But using a hanger wedged under the vinyl siding to hold a piece of screen over the dryer vent is not in the building code.  Or the good idea code.  Plus, those little plastic louvered covers are cheap, work much better and pretty much close completely when the air flow stops, keeping most of the bugs out.  Little bugs can still get in here.  And lint can build up here pretty easily.

To comment or ask questions about this article please send email to richard@habitecinspections.com.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

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http://habitecinspections.com

Get a Grip, Nashville!

Nashville Home Inspection – What’s Wrong With This Picture?  10-19-12

Look at the picture below.  Do you know what’s missing?

missing handrail

HINT:  Try to get a grasp on things.

ANSWER:  It looks nice enough, doesn’t it?  New paint and all.  But let’s count the steps.  I count 5, when you include the last step up to porch.  So what is missing?  How about a “graspable handrail”?  A graspable handrail is recommended any time the number of step risers is 4 or more.  So you might say they have it in the 2×4 handrail on the left, right?  Not really.  There is a very specific definition of a “graspable handrail”.  In fact it is so detailed it is best to show you a picture.  Please see below.

The International Residential Code (IRC) rules are mostly in place now.  The handgrip portion of the graspable handrail shall not be less than 1 1/4  inches or more than 2 inches in cross sectional dimension, or the shape shall provide an equivalent gripping surface.  The handgrip shall have a smooth surface with no sharp corners.  Handrails projecting from the wall shall have a space of not less than 1 1/2 inches between the wall and the handrail.  The handrail should be continuous and should return to the wall or the rail at the ends.  So the basic idea of a graspable handrail is something you can wrap your fingers around.  That is why a 2×4 does not work.  Think about the very young and the elderly.  On any step system, but certainly on one with steep steps or with uneven step risers, they need a graspable handrail that is firmly mounted to help them up and down.

To comment or ask questions about this article please email richard@habitecinspections.com.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

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http://habitecinspections.com

Nashville Home Inspector – Do you remember the old Jenga Game?

Look at the picture below. What’s wrong?

HINT:  Do you remember the game Jenga?  A HABITEC Home Inspector recently came upon the situation below.  What’s wrong?

ANSWER: Well, when you are down in the crawl space and no one is around to see what you do, or don’t do, just grab anything that will fill the void, right?  Just like the old Jenga game, where the challenge was to stack loose wood as high as possible and hope the entire game did not collapse, at least not while you are down there.  Must have been what the guy who created this masterpiece was thinking.  This helped explain all the cracks in the drywall inside the home.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753.

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on LinkedThank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Exterior Electrical Installation – What’s Wrong With This Picture? 6.11.11

Nashville Home Inspector – Exterior Electrical Installation – What’s Wrong With This Picture?  6.11.11

HINT:  If you can see the romex cable at an exterior installation, it is probably a mistake.

Tapped Exterior Light

 ANSWER:  Actually, two things are wrong.  First, this electrical circuit probably is not designed to handle whatever additional load is place on it by the additional component at the other end of this romex cable.  And it is true, if you can see the romex at an exterior installation, because it is unprotected, then it is probably a mistake, as it is here.  This was an after-thought installation completed by a do-it-yourselfer.   This romex conductor was installed to supply power to another exterior light nearby.   So it is likely no one verified the circuit can handle the additional load and no one made any effort to protect this conductor from mechanical or weather damage. 

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Lintel Plate Installation – What’s Wrong with this Picture? 6.25.11

Nashville Home Inspector – Lintel Plate Installation – What’s Wrong With This Picture?  6.25.11

HINT:  Lintel Plates are the metal strip that should be installed across the top of exterior doors and windows.  Lintel plates should extend into the exterior surface above the door and/or window they protect.  Look closely at the lintel plate as it crosses above this door and window installation at a rear porch.

Poor Lintel Plate Installation

ANSWER:  The purpose of a lintel plate is to provide structural support for the exterior surface, in this case brick veneer, above an opening in the shell such as a door and/or window.  Without this support, the weight of the brick veneer would overpower the frame of the window or door and cause the brick veneer to collapse.  Below is a closeup of the lintel plate near the point where the door on the left meets the windows on the right.  Look how the lintel plate has dropped down above the windows.  Why did this happen?

Split Lintel Installation

Lintel plates should extend uninterrupted across the opening in the shell, be it door and/or window.  In fact, the lintel plate should extend beyond the sides of the door or window and into the shell several inches so that the vertical weight load is distributed to the shell beyond the sides of the door or window.  In this case, the lintel plates did extend past the ends of the door and windows.  But, this split in the middle is what caused the problem here.  By not using a continuous plate the loads at the split allowed the vertical loads to overcome the frame of the window and start the collapse of the brick veneer.  Look at the picture below to see that the brick veneer is not only dropping down but also falling out away from the wall.

Collapsed Brick Veneer

In the picture above, the only thing holding the brick veneer above the windows is the wood fascia in front of the brick.  This situation needs repair and will likely require complete re-installation.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Poor Roof Installation – What’s Wrong With this Picture?

Nashville Home Inspector – Poor Roof Installation – What’s Wrong With This Picture? 4.16.11

HINT:  Actually there are three things wrong.  One involves metal, one involves wood, and one issue involves proximity.  Please see the picture below for the first issue discussed, the metal issue.

Roof Flashing Discrepancy

ANSWER:  Hopefully the metal issue jumps out at you.  For locators, you are standing on a ladder looking at a 2nd floor corner of a house where the roof joins the brick veneer.  Look at the metal flashing.  Look at the cracks, or gaps, in the flashing caulk as it comes around the corner of the house.  You should be able to see the vertical gaps in the caulk were they have opened up and the flashing has pulled away from the veneer.  This is a water leak waiting to happen.  The next picture is a closeup of this discrepancy.

Closeup of Loose Flashing

But, a more subtle issue also lurks in the photos above.  This issue involves some wood.  See the picture below for another view.  Remember, water flows downhill following the path of least resistance.

Poor Roof Valley Instalaltion

So in the pic above where is the water flowing down the valley on the right going to go?  Looks like it terminates at the piece of vertical wood trim.  So the wood trim acts like a bit of a dam, doesn’t it?  See another closeup of this installation below.

Poor Roof Valley Termination

Sure, eventually the water in the valley comes down and kicks out around the end of the wood trim and valley and goes on down the roof, but was it really necessary to point the valley exactly at this corner of the house.  NO!  A better design would terminate the valley to the right of the corner of the house so the majority of the water runoff does not flow into the wood trim and the side of the house.  This installation combined with the cracked flashing caulk makes a roof leak at this corner likely. 

And the third issue with this installation is proximity.  Most manufacturers of wood or composite siding require at least 1″ spacing between adjacent roof shingles and their siding products.  Failure to provide this spacing can allow water from the roof to wick onto and into the siding material and damage it.  In the pictures above you can see the composite siding and wood trim are all the way down and into contact with the roof shingles.  In fact, if you look close at one picture above, and look up the roof somewhat, you can see where some of the composite siding has already started to be damaged (flaking) due to moisture.  The 1″ spacing would have prevented this.  Another picture of this damage is provided below.

Damaged Siding in Contact with Shingles

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspectors – Service Conductors – What’s Wrong With This Picture

Nashville Home Inspector – Service Conductor Intrusion – What’s Wrong With this Picture? 3-22-11

HINT:  Electrical power and vegetation should not share the same space.

Powerful Trees

ANSWER:  It is seldom a good idea that vegetation and power lines share the same space.  This vine grew up from below and seriously encroached on the electrical power mask.  Movement of the vine can damage the insulation on the wires and make electrocution and serious power malfunctions a possibility.  See the insulation that has worn away below.

Damaged Insulation

This should never have been allowed to happen, and getting the vine out of the wires is no easy, or amateur, job.  This is a classic example of deferred maintenance.  Below is a view of how this got started.

vine growth

HABITEC recommends a minimum of 18″ of space between vegetation and any component of a home or building.

Please contact Richard at richard@habitecinspections.com should you have any questions.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspectors – Condensate Drain Terminations Done Wrong

 
Condensate Drains Done Wrong
 
by
 
 
During a Nashville Home Inspection, HABITEC Home Inspectors include condensate drain terminations as part of the inspection of the HVAC systems.
 
Every home that has an air conditioning unit has a condensate drain.  A normal part of the home cooling process is to dehumidify the air in a home.  Dryer air causes perspiration to evaporate from our skin which gives us a feeling of cooling.  But, when air is dehumidified the moisture that is pulled out of the air has to go somewhere.  Hence the need for a condensate drain.
 
But condensate drains can be installed incorrectly.  And depending on the type of drain system, different mistakes can be made.  One way an air conditioning unit condensation is removed from the unit is with a condensate pump.  See the picture below.
 
 
Condensation is removed from the A/C unit and deposited at the pump via the white PVC drain line shown vertically in the photo above.  The pump then pumps the fluid to a suitable location using a small diameter composite (plastic) tube shown on the left above.  HABITEC recommends that this fluid be removed to the outside of the building and to a location at least 18″ from the foundation wall and to terrain that slopes away from the building.  Some times DIYers can find interesting places to terminate their drain lines. 
 
Look at the picture below of a condensate pump drain line termination.  What’s wrong with this picture?  The little tube is the condensate drain line.  The big pipe is the waste line of the home plumbing drain waste and vent system.  Why is the little tube connected to the big tube?  Should it be?

A closeup below gives a better look.  The condensate drain line is simply plugged into the side of the waste pipe and glued into place.  And it appears the connection has leaked.  But even if it had not leaked, what is inside the waster line that is a threat?  Answer, sewer gas.  And sewer gas can be harmful, even fatal to people.  So by making this connection the potential for toxic sewer gas to enter the home via the condensate drain line is increased.  In fact, this connection is a violation of the plumbing code and should be removed.

Please contact Richard at richard@habitecinspections.com should you have any questions.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Toilet Leaks, How Bad Can It Be?

 

Leaking Toilets – How Bad Can It Be?

by

Richard Acree

http://habitecinspections.com

WARNING – IF YOU ARE SQUEEMISH, DO NOT LOOK AT THESE PICTURES!

What happens when a toilet leaks below the toilet?  Sure, that can be bad, but how bad can it be?  Brace for the following pics, because it can be real bad.

In the pics below the wood has rotted and mold-like material has developed, the metal support structure has rusted significantly, and stalactites of waste material have grown on the framing.  This is a situation out of control and in need of immediate repair.

Below is a closeup of the rotted wood and stalactite of bacteria.

The following picture is from the other side of the last pic, showing the rusted framing, rotted wood and unfortunately, the stalactite of bacteria.

And the last picture is of the mold-like material growing on the dropped ceiling tile.

Obviously, this toilet leak has created a problem that has gotten out of hand.  This is why, at HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, offering home and commercial building inspections in Nashville and Middle Tennessee, we have virtually zero tolerance for loose toilets.  Immediate attention is required in this case.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Painted Floor Joists, Who Does That?

Nashville Home Inspector: Painted floor joists, who does that?  Few people would spend the time or money to have their floor joists painted. 

Look at the picture below.  Those floor joists are visible from the underside and they have been painted white.  But notice the subfloor has not been painted.  What’s going on here?

Fire Damaged Joist - Distant

The picture above is from a short distance.  Let’s zoom in for a closer look below.

Fire Damaged Wood - Closeup

In the picture above you can see the “cracks” in the wood nearest you.  This is wood that has been charred by a previous fire.  A fire leaves damage like that and an odor. 

One way to “repair” fire damaged wood is to paint it with a special paint designed to not only cover the visible discoloration but also mitigate the odor left over from the fire.  This works for these reasons, but the Client/Buyer still needs to know this home had a fire and realize that the structural integrity of these joists is at least slightly compromised.  Compromised, or damaged floor joists, can be repaired by installing an adjacent joist that is fastened to the damaged joist and surrounding structural members.  This is sometimes called scabbing.  Scabbing a damaged joist is acceptable and you can see the bottom of the scabbed joist running next to the damaged joist.  The original subfloor was probably replaced and the owner just stopped painting beyond the fire damaged joists.

Thank you, 

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Asbestos Duct Insulation

 
ASBESTOS DUCT INSULATION
Asbestos Duct Tape and Insulation was used commonly many years ago in many homes and buildings.  Unfortunately asbestos proved to be a carcinogen and was banned from many uses.  It is still being manufactured and used in more controlled situations today, but the older asbestos that remains in place in some older homes can be an issue on a Home Inspection.  Look at the picture below.  What Wrong With this Picture?

HINT:  What’s that white stuff on the old ductwork?  And, the house is over 70 years old.

 

ANSWER:  Probably asbestos.  And it is loose and frayed.  I say probably because there have been some instances where material was misidentified as asbestos just because of how it looks.  If in doubt, have it removed.  This material in the picture above should be removed or covered in such a way that it cannot disperse into the air.  Asbestos that is not loose or frayed is not considered an environmental threat.  But, few people will accept any asbestos in their homes today.  Best have it removed.

Thank you, 

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

HABITEC Completes Another Continuing Education Course for REALTORS in TN!

HABITEC Completes Another Continuing Education course presentation for REALTORS licensed in Tennessee!!

On January 19, 2011, HABITEC presented the TENNESSEE HOME INSPECTION course at the Middle Tennessee Association of REALTORS (MTAR) facility at 311 Butler Drive, Murfreesboro, TN, 37127, from 08:30 AM – 4:00 PM.  The Point of Contact at MTAR for this class was Roshawnda Perry-Barlow, MTAR Education Manager roshawnda@mtar.org 615-893-2242, 877-893-2242.

HABITEC offers the 6 hour TREC-approved class in Home Inspection topics pertinent to REALTORS.  Topics include Exterior Components, Interior Spaces and Components, Foundations, Roof and Attic, HVAC, Electrical, and Plumbing.  These classes are available in a classroom setting with Richard Acree as the Instructor.  The classes are offered as a power point presentation with hundreds of fascinating pictures and interesting perspective offered by Richard.  These classes also give REALTORS a chance to interact with a certified and licensed Home Inspector, ask questions and discuss in general and in detail the issues that come up during a Home Inspection.  

The purpose of this course is to explain the rules of the State of Tennessee, Department of Commerce and Insurance, for Home Inspection procedures, methods and requirements.  The classes will help Realtors understand what the Home Inspector should be looking at and what the Home Inspector should be looking for.  Terminology, methods of inspection, tools and limitations of the Home Inspection processes will be included. 

The end result of this course will be to help REALTORS understand the State of Tennessee rules and requirements for Home Inspections and better prepare the REALTOR to discuss the Home Inspection Report with their Client.  The Client will then be able to understand the report and make a better decision regarding the real estate transaction.

REFERENCES:   The following REALTORS attended the Class and have graciously offered to use their name as references for the course.

Chery Damron, 931-308-5593, cdamron@realtracs.com 

Fernard Hennings, 615-556-8431, fhennings@realtracs.com 

Steve Gibson, 615-796-8663, sgibson@realtracs.com 

Lynne Davis, 615-394-5299, lynnedavisrealtor@gmail.com 

Hayden Bryson, 615-812-8871, hbryson@realtracs.com 

Sandra Watson, 615-545-2914, sandrawatson@realtracs.com 

Vanessa Coe, 615-415-4954, vand95@comcast.net 

Sharon Swafford, 931-224-4663, Sharon@SharonSwafford.com 

Haven Arnold, 615-417-2299, myagenthaven@aol.com 

Ed Stinson, 615-828-8821, edstinson@realtracs.com 

Margie Maurer, 615-481-9496, mmaurer@realtracs.com 

Wayne Yancey, 615-887-0212, wayne@mid-tn-realestate.com 

Richard Atkinson, 615-574-0001, ratkinson@realtracs.com 

Gary Middleton, 615-310-6475, gmiddleton@greenvalehomes.net 

The next class is scheduled for:  February 16, 2011 at the Eastern Middle Tennessee Association of REALTORS, 2588 North Mt. Juliet Road, Mt, Juliet, TN, 37122, from 08:30 AM – 4:00 PM. The EMTAR Point of Contact is Cher Dugan, Senior Administrative Assistant, DuganC@realtracs.com, 615-758-9851.    

Thank you, 

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Silly Ductwork Installations

 
Silly HVAC Ductwork Installations
 
by
 
 
Sometimes the Do-It-Yourselfers create great comic relief for Nashville Home Inspectors.  HVAC ductwork installation is one common source.  Look at the pictures below.  What’s wrong?

HINT:  Just do it?  Works on the track, not in a house.

ANSWER:  I don’t really have an answer for this, except maybe “Just don’t do it?!”  But for those who cannot see it clearly, yes, that is a NIKE shoe box used to complete a line of HVAC ductwork.  The box and a tube of caulk!

So let’s look at another silly picture of DIY ductwork installation.  Look at the picture below.  What’s wrong here? 

HINT:  Sometimes having a little material left over is not a bad thing.

ANSWER:  In general, only the length of HVAC ductwork as is necessary is recommended.  And there are limits to how long a certain run of ductwork can be.  In the picture above the excess ductwork should have been eliminated. 

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Roofers Gone Wild!

 
ROOFERS GONE WILD! – HOW TO MESS UP A PERFECTLY GOOD ROOF
 
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At HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC, we sometimes see situations during a Home Inspection and we wonder just what were they thinking.  It seems like they did things wrong just to say they could.  Look at the picture of the roof shingles below.  What’s wrong?

HINT: Water flows downhill, and this picture was taken from a roof top.

ANSWER:  Actually this is wrong from whatever angle you look at it.  In any condition, whether in a valley as shown or on a slope of the roof, composite roof shingles should always be installed so that the shingles overlap from the top down.  In other words, the upper shingle overlaps the lower shingle.  In this photo, the shingles from one side of the valley were simply carried over on top of the other side, in the forefront.  That puts the downslope shingles above the upslope shingles.  It won’t take much for water from upslope shingles to slip under the downslope shingles and onto the decking below.  This is a poor roof valley shingle installation.  The picture below is how it should look.  And the picture below is from the same roof, different valley.  What were they thinking?

On the same house the shingles have been used as siding for the second floor dormers.  This is not the usual but it is allowed.  Look at the “siding” below.  Does that look OK?  HINT:  NO!

ANSWER:  The hint already gave it away.  The correct way to install these “siding shingles” is shown below.  Neat and orderly with the top shingle overlapping the lower shingle.

Last but not least, strange things come to homes in foreclosure.  For an example see the picture below.  What’s missing from this new roof?  HINT:  New roof shingles should look similar to each other.

ANSWER:  The good news is that the shingles needed to finish this ridge are laying over there on the right in this picture.  Some of them anyway.  This home went into foreclosure while the builder/roofer were installing the new roof.  Knowing they probably would not get paid, they at least covered the ridge opening with whatever they had handy.  Then just left the rest laying up on the roof.  In this case we do know what they were thinking.

To comment on this article email to richard@habitecinspections.com

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Confined Spaces – When Is Tight Too Tight?

 
Confined Spaces – When is Tight Too Tight?
 
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Recently I had a REALTOR ask if there were circumstances when an Inspector would not crawl through the entire crawl space.  I explained that sometimes we don’t go everywhere in the crawl space because it simply is not possible or safe.  I went on to explain that access to some areas of the crawl space may be blocked by debris, HVAC ductwork and/or tight spacing.  That did not seem to be the answer she was looking for.  But it got me to thinking, when is tight too tight?  Take a look at the picture below.

What you are looking at, in addition to the wet crawl space, is ductwork running through a crawl space.  There is a corner on the left and, yes, you can see around the corner when you get up to it, but there is also an area behind the ductwork to the right that you cannot see.  Is that area accessible?  Not from this angle.  So if there is not another way back there, what next?  Force your way under the ductwork?  Absolutely not!  There is not enough room plus that stuff is heavy.  Even if you could squirm under somewhere, what happens if an HVAC strap lets go because of your effort and the whole thing comes down on top of the Inspector?  How is the Inspector to get out from underneath all that weight?  And quickly before suffocation?

You cannot go over the ductwork for two reasons.  First, there is no room.  And second, even if there was room, what if you lost your balance and dropped onto the ductwork, damaging it?  Who is going to pay to fix it?  The Client?  The REALTOR?  Probably not.  Will the home owner just let it go?  Doubt it.  No, I think that one is on the Inspector.  Can he fix it himself?  No.  He probably does not have the tools, training, material or license to do the work.  So he is stuck with the bill.  All because he tried to go somewhere he couldn’t.

So in this case, without another path behind the ductwork, that area is inaccessible.  Too tight!

Oh by the way, here is what it looked like after I turned that corner.  Still not much luck.

Some general safety rules of crawl space entry are as follows.  These rules can be applied to Inspectors and home owners alike.

1.  Take two flashlights and a cell phone.  If the first light loses power, you’ll have the second to find your way out.  The cell phone comes in very handy if you get trapped or hurt.  It’s also another source of light, albeit a poor one.

2.  Make sure someone knows you will be in a crawl space and approximately when you should be out of the crawl space.  That way if you become incapacitated hopefully someone will realize you are missing before it is too late.

3.  Do not crawl over ductwork, standing water or electrical lines.  If you have to crawl over ductwork, move components or take in a breath to enter a space, it is too close to be entered. 

4.  Be alert to Confined Spaces that should not be entered.  Do not force your way into areas that are too close.  NACHI has an excellent Continuing Education course about Home Inspector safety that deals with this issue.  According to NACHI and the OSHA website, a “confined space,” as defined in OSHA’s General Industry Standard (29.CFR.1910), is a space that:

 a.  is large enough and is so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work;

 b.  has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example:  tanks, vessels, silos, bins, hoppers, vaults, pits, etc.); and

 c.  is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.

NOTE:  OSHA defines a crawl space as a non-permit required confined space.  Therefore, a Home Inspector can enter a crawl space without a permit but according to item 4.a above, if the space is not large enough to enter and perform assigned work or the employee [Home Inspector] cannot perform assigned work [because the space is too tight], this space should not be entered.  In Tennessee, the TN Home Inspection Rules as established by the TN Department of Commerce, Rules for Home Inspectors, Chapter 0780-5-12.10, Standards of Practice, item 6.b.3, states that “Home Inspectors are not required to enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely affect the health or safety of the home inspector or other persons.” 

5.  Be alert to strange odors that can be a hint of problems.  Obviously, if you smell gas, leave immediately.  Crawl space odors like watermelon indicate the presence of snakes.  If you observe snakes or evidence of snakes, or any other animal or pest that may be a threat to your health, leave the crawl space immediately.  Make a note on the report.

6.  Use a fanny pack to carry small items in the crawl space, like your cell phone and equipment testers you may need.

7.  Wear gloves and breathing protection.  The gloves protect your hand somewhat when you are searching around in the dark and the breathing protection protects you from all the dust and insulation you can breathe in.

So hey, let’s be careful out there. If you would like to comment on this article please email to richard@habitecinspections.com

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Condensate Pump Drain Line Termination

Condensate Pump Drain Line Termination 

by

Richard Acree

http://habitecinspections.com

Condensate pumps like that shown on the right are frequently used to literally pump the fluid drained from a HVAC evaporator coil to a place where it can be disposed of properly.  In the best scenario, a condensate pump is not necessary and the condensation fluid is simply drained to an exterior port of termination.  If draining the fluid is not possible, a condensate pump is used to lift (ie. pump) the fluid to an exterior termination point.  Conditions that require a condensation pump is when a HVAC split system interior unit, which contains the evaporator coil, is mounted in a basement or garage.  In these locations the unit is mounted at one of the lowest positions in the building and perhaps below the exterior grade.  In order to properly dispose of the condensation fluid, the fluid must be lifted to an exterior termination point.

So what’s the problem?  Well, sometimes people can be creative with their condensation pump terminations.  Really!  The idea is to remove the condensation to an exterior termination point.  Sometimes Do-It-Yourselfers, and some shifty HVAC techs, can terminate their condensation drain lines in places they should not.  Look at the picture below.  What’s wrong with this?

HINT:  Why is the little tube connected to the big tube?

A closeup below gives a better look.  The big pipe is the main waste drain line of the drain, waste and vent system.  The drain line where all the bad, smelly stuff goes.  Why is that little plastic/composite drain line plumbed into the main waste line?  And should it be?

ANSWER:  It shouldn’t be.  That small plastic drain is a condensate drain line from the condensate drain pump shown above.  These condensate drain lines should not be connected to a component of the drain waste and vent system because this provides a path for waste system gases to backflow into the house or building.  Plus it looks like it’s leaking.  What a mess!  This is exactly how the condensate drain line should not be terminated!

To comment or ask questions about this article please email to richard@habitecinspections.com.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!

Nashville Home Inspector – Open Electrical Junction Box

Open Electrical Junction Box

by

Richard Acree

http://habitecinspections.com

Have you ever wandered through the attic or crawl space and seen something like that in the picture below?  Did you do anything about it?  If not, please read on.

 

Sometimes an electrician will cut corners in places where they think nobody will notice, or care.  One of those corners is electrical junction boxes.  These boxes are required at various times in an electrical installation.  The corner they cut is the cover for the box.  Inside the junction box is where electrical conductors are joined together.  Usually this junction is with some of those plastic nuts shown in the picture below. 

Occasionally, those nuts have been known to come loose and wires, which are under some stress after having been crammed into the junction box, have moved.  Some even loosen and disconnect.  Now if someone comes along and puts an object inside that open box, an object like a screwdriver or finger, you can imagine how exciting it will get when the sparks fly.  This is an electrocution waiting to happen. 

Now look at the picture below for another implication of how an open junction box can create a serious problem.  In the picture below you are in a crawl space looking up at an open junction box.  Clearly you should be able to see the open junction box.  But what else is wrong?

HINT:  Metal, like copper piping, is an excellent conductor of electricity.

ANSWER:  This situation is especially dangerous because the open conductors are hanging directly above the copper metal plumbing pipes.  So let’s just go ahead and power up the entire plumbing system when one of these conductors comes loose and drops down onto the pipes.  YIKES!  Get those open electrical boxes covered!

To comment on this article please write to richard@habitecinspections.com.

To comment or ask questions about this article please email to richard@habitecinspections.com.

Thank you,

Richard Acree

Comments in this blog posting are the copyrighted intellectual property of Richard Acree, President, HABITEC Home and Building Inspections, LLC,  and are intended to educate and otherwise assist home owners, sellers and buyers, building owners, sellers and buyers, realtors, real estate investors, property managers, and lenders in the process of owning, buying or selling homes or commercial buildings.  HABITEC is a residential (home) and commercial building inspection company serving Middle Tennessee including Nashville, Brentwood, Franklin, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Mt. Juliet, Hendersonville, Dickson, Belle Meade, Columbia, Spring Hill, Lebanon, Gallatin and more!  In addition to building inspections HABITEC offers Environmental Services for mold assessments, radon testing and water quality analysis.  Additional information about HABITEC can be found on our website at http://habitecinspections.com, or call 615-376-2753. 

Richard Acree is the author of  the HABITEC Home and Building Inspections blog at ActiveRain, WordPress, and Blogger, and Founder of the ActiveRain Group Tennessee Home and Building Inspectors.  All are welcome to join and comment on those blogs and group.   You can also follow HABITEC on Facebook and Richard on Linked.  Thank you!